OMMA Social Panel: The Personal CPM: Quirky Idea or Future Marketing Reality?

Moderator, Charlene LiLi by Thomas Hawk via Flickr
The Personal CPM: Quirky Idea or Future Marketing Reality?

Moderator: Charlene Li, Founder, The Altimeter Group
David Honig, Co-Founder, Media6Degrees
Joe Marchese, President, SocialVibe
Jamie Tedford, Founder/CEO, Brand Networks
Eric Wheeler, CEO, 33Across

Q: Something about the social graph. Charlene's mic isn't working well.

Eric: With media, it's about the connections between people and the strong bonds. You can use social network theory to model your audience.

Joe: The idea of packaging the social graph is simple. You used to advertise to people. Now you're advertising through people. [My take: this creeps me out the way he says it, and I'm good friends with Joe. If I think advertisers are marketing through me, I'm going to start clamping down.]

David: With social graph activities, as long as it's anonymous, you can find the nodes that matter to you.

Jamie: It's interesting if it's not anonymous. Sears did a campaign. They're giving away $10 gift certificates to become a fan of the page. They realize the lifetime value of what they pay for the media plus $10.

David: You're never going to get lifetime value just by that one time action (e.g. becoming a fan).

Joe: There are two ideas. One is the consumer as a source of media. … People have a personal CPM they have to be compensated for. You want people to spread your brand intentionally, not by accident. That takes planning.

David: Compensating them is another topic. I'll use my Duane Reade card to save a dollar but I won't give them access to my credit card.  … There have to be rules.

Jamie: We're comfortable with poitns programs. How come we're not comfortable with rewarding true engagement?

Joe: You've got to say these people are publishers of social content and go from there. … You can reward people for sharing your brand.

Eric: Like microlending, we'll see stuff happening with microblogging. We'll see ways to rank/score people on a consistent basis. [Me: This is also freaking me out a bit if I think everyone's scoring me. As if the pressures to conform weren't bad enough in high school…]

Jamie: I always believed Facebook and MySpace were CRM systems – building fan lists, etc. The goal is to aggregate users and fans. They are hand raisers, and by doing that they're more valuable and more credible.

Joe: There's an idea of user-generated targeting. … It's a lot harder when you used to buy advertising and now you're trying to get people to share Colgate.

Charlene: Is it all about tapping evangelists? Not necessarily. It's about tapping into people's passions.

My QScary Stories cover with creepy hand lock'creepy' Image via Wikipedia: How do you avoid creeping people out?

Via Twitter:d_rey: @Jack2point0 RT Awesome quote: "the more you guys talk, the more you creep me out" #ommasocial

Eric: Behavioral targeting was all about the marketer. With social media, 70% of US is involved in social networking. Charlene Li has said social networking will be like air. We'll see more players in this space giving back to people and making it more valuable. People will get back

David: Is it creepy when you walk into the grocery store and they know all this about you. {missed the rest of this]

Joe: Sorry for creepign you out. Any medium can be abused. I see social media getting abused daily online. You avoid a lot of it simply by asking people for permission.

Jamie: To me, it's a kinder, gentler marketing. It's 'marketing with' instead of 'marketing to.'

Charlene: Remember Caller ID when it first came out? That really creeped out people too. [Umm, but that's not marketing.]

[My overall take on this: I still don't think they fully address how creepy it is to market through a person and piggyback on their personal brands. Marketing to someone is far more passive and innocuous.]

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